3 Quick Resources for Military Families Moving Overseas

Military parents whose children have disabilities may have concerns about moving their child from a stateside school (public or Department of Defense) to a school in another country where their school options are limited and laws protecting individuals with disabilities are not the same. Here are three quick resources for these parents to give them a jump-start on their research and decision-making:

Military Families Overseas: Does ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) Apply?

Military Children Transitioning into the DoDEA School System (podcast from the Military Child Education Coalition, with Dr. Dell W. McMullen, Europe Director for Student Excellence, Department of Defense Education Activity (DoDEA)

Department of Defense Directory on Early Intervention, Special Education and Related Services in OCONUS Communities (“OCONUS” – Outside the Continental United States)

And here is some more in-depth information about Department of Defense Education Activity schools and Special Education:

Department of Defense Education Activity (DoDEA) School System

Download this article as a Word .docx

Help for Grandparents and Other Temporary Caregivers of Military Children-with Handout

It’s fairly common for military-connected children to stay with other family members or family friends when their parent’s military duties take them away for extended periods.  Parents will try to anticipate what the caregiver will need but life has a way of inserting the unexpected. Parent centers can use these resources to help:

  • Military parents planning for their child’s time away
  • Long- and short-term temporary caregivers

Continue reading “Help for Grandparents and Other Temporary Caregivers of Military Children-with Handout”

Disasters and Emergencies-Help Military Families with These Resources

When natural disasters and other emergencies strike, your Parent Center will step up to locate services and supports for affected families. Military families have some additional concerns during emergencies, but they also have significant resources available for just such situations. You can direct military families to these resources both during an emergency, and for future planning, which lets your Parent Center concentrate on other types of assistance. The military resources include planning for an evacuation when individuals have disabilities.

Continue reading “Disasters and Emergencies-Help Military Families with These Resources”

Easy Branch Orientation and Guide to Staff Training

We’ve created a guide to our most useful materials on military families: their culture, their unique needs, and the military systems that support them when they have a child with a disability. There is something for every staff member, from those with lengthy experience working with military families to those just starting out. AND-links to parent handouts, including 3 handouts you can brand with your Parent Center logo!

Continue reading “Easy Branch Orientation and Guide to Staff Training”

What is JAG and how does it relate to Special Education?

JAG stands for Judge Advocate General, and the JAG Corps (sometimes just known as JAG) is the legal branch of the military. Officers in the JAG work as legal advisors to a specific command, but their services are also available to individual service members and their families. When a military family has a child with special educational or medical needs, the JAG officer can be an invaluable resource. Families can be advised on their legal rights with respect to their child’s education (including differences between public and Department of Defense schools), legal preparation for deployment, Supplemental Social Security (SSI) and estate planning.

Continue reading “What is JAG and how does it relate to Special Education?”

Restraint & Seclusion Laws for Each State

When working with military families, here is a helpful resource to share with those who may have concerns about restraint and seclusion in their State or one to which their family may be relocated.  It gives specific information for each State, and is up to date as of December 31, 2016.

U.S. Department of Education Restraint & Seclusion policies by State (external link)

Another resources which has been recommended by several Parent Centers is available through The Autism National Committee (Autcom.org):  How Safe is the Schoolhouse?  (external link)

 

What Does a Parent Center Do?

Federally funded Parent Training and Information Centers (PTIs) are found in every State, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. Large States have more than one PTI.   In addition, thirty federally funded Community Parent Resource Centers (CPRCs) focus on unserved or underserved populations throughout the United States and territories. Together, the PTIs and CPRCs (collectively referred to as Parent Centers) can play a vital role in supporting your work with Exceptional Family Members in your communities. The following information is a quick fact sheet on what a federally funded Parent Center is required to do through their grants and some suggestions on how you can utilize them effectively.

Continue reading “What Does a Parent Center Do?”

Financial Assistance for Military Families

When working with military families it is important to know that they sometimes face a unique set of financial challenges. Frequent moves and deployments are just two of the many factors that can cause those financial hardships. In addition to community resources, there are military organizations to whom you can refer families and whose purpose is to provide financial assistance to service members and their families. Each branch of the military has a specific relief or aid society.

Continue reading “Financial Assistance for Military Families”