Help Military Families Prepare Their Child’s School for Deployment -with handout!

As we know, having a parent away for a lengthy time places extra stress on children and the at-home parent, siblings or other care givers. No matter how often a military parent is deployed, and no matter how well-prepared a child might be for a parent’s absence, children with disabilities may be particularly vulnerable to the effects of stress on their physical and emotional well-being.

To help improve support for the child and increased understanding and support from teachers and schools, here are a few ways you and your center can help military families prepare their child’s school for deployment:

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Resolve School Issues with the Interstate Compact-2 Parent Handouts

The Interstate Compact is an excellent tool for your work with military families. There are resources for parents that describe what the Interstate Compact is, and what it can be used for. These two handouts are for military parents who want to know what specific steps to take to start resolving issues by using the Compact, and what their next steps are if their first efforts don’t succeed. You’ll find them helpful too!

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8 Free Apps for Your Work With Military Families!

Eight apps created for military-connected professionals, service members, and their families can also be useful for you and the families you serve. They’re designed to address situations that challenge military families, such as a service member’s return from a long deployment or relocating to a new duty station.  Many of the apps teach ways to cope with stress and anxiety, like breathing and mindfulness practices. We hope you will check out three in particular: PTSD Coach, Parenting2Go and The Big Moving Adventure

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Activity Grants for Military-Connected Kids

For children in National Guard or Reservist families, or whose parent was injured in military service.

When a family has a child with disabilities, it may be challenging to find activities and programs that are both affordable and benefit their child. This grant program helps fund activities for military-connected children, with and without disabilities, whose parents have financial challenges because of their service.

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OPSEC and Ham: Personal Information and Your Work with Military Families

Your work with military families can be rewarding, especially when they share information with you that’s useful for getting them the help they need. Military families don’t always share information freely, because they are told not to share personal details—or even the fact that they are a military family. This is because of Operational Security, often referred to as OPSEC. This article explains the ways OPSEC may limit what a military family can share, and how you can build trust with military families. Oh yes, and it explains the ham!

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Procedural Safeguards in Department of Defense Education Activity (DODEA) Schools

Parent Centers know the Procedural Safeguards in the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Did you know that Department of Defense Activity (DoDEA) Schools have their own processes? If you work with military families who have a Permanent Change of Station (PCS) to or from these locations or work in the following locations (whose children attended or plan on attending a DoDEA school) this information will be particularly helpful for you.  Continue reading “Procedural Safeguards in Department of Defense Education Activity (DODEA) Schools”

Providing Training: Ideas for your work with families, youth, and young adults who are military connected

We know how hard you work to provide in-person and virtual training, and information for parents. According to the Center for Parent Information and Resources, Parent Centers achieved more than 1 million contacts, just through trainings and individual assistance. This number is in addition to the millions of website visits and resource dissemination numbers that were accomplished. Most importantly, at least 90% of those surveyed found that programs and services met their needs, helped them understand how to get their child’s needs met, and that they were able to put the information to use.

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