Military Children, Accommodations and College Entrance Exams

The transition from high school to college can be a daunting experience for any teenager, however, it can be even more challenging when that teenager is part of a military family. Part of the transition process is preparing for and taking the entrance exams to college. If the student is receiving accommodations in school, he/she may qualify to receive special accommodations when taking a college entrance exam. Being aware of the process and requirements to receive accommodations can help ease the anxiety and pressure of taking the test. Continue reading “Military Children, Accommodations and College Entrance Exams”

State Report Cards Will Include Military Students

The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) requires States to report on the academic progress of military-connected students and other important data that will tell military parents, advocates for military children, and Parent Centers who serve military families how well these highly-mobile students are doing in school. Read on for expected outcomes, links to articles on the topic, and the key excerpt from ESSA.

Continue reading “State Report Cards Will Include Military Students”

What is JAG and how does it relate to Special Education?

JAG stands for Judge Advocate General, and the JAG Corps (sometimes just known as JAG) is the legal branch of the military. Officers in the JAG work as legal advisors to a specific command, but their services are also available to individual service members and their families. When a military family has a child with special educational or medical needs, the JAG officer can be an invaluable resource. Families can be advised on their legal rights with respect to their child’s education (including differences between public and Department of Defense schools), legal preparation for deployment, Supplemental Social Security (SSI) and estate planning.

Continue reading “What is JAG and how does it relate to Special Education?”

Webinar: What the Office of Community Support for Military Families with Special Needs (OSN) and Department of Defense Education Activity (DoDEA) do for Military Families

In case you haven’t seen it: The Office of Community Support for Military Families with Special Needs (OSN) and the Department of Defense Education Activity share what their offices do, and how they support your work with military families. It is a great introduction to key military programs, and helpful whether you are new to your Parent Center, new to working with military families, or are a seasoned professional.  Continue reading “Webinar: What the Office of Community Support for Military Families with Special Needs (OSN) and Department of Defense Education Activity (DoDEA) do for Military Families”

Interstate Compact Presentation by the Military Interstate Compact Commission (MIC3)

Interstate Compact Military Presentation by Rick Masters, General Counsel for MIC3, the Military Interstate Children’s Compact Commission.  Includes Question and Answer session about this important legal protection for military-connected children in public schools K-12.  Includes a handout for military parents.

Continue reading “Interstate Compact Presentation by the Military Interstate Compact Commission (MIC3)”

Restraint & Seclusion Laws for Each State

When working with military families, here is a helpful resource to share with those who may have concerns about restraint and seclusion in their State or one to which their family may be relocated.  It gives specific information for each State, and is up to date as of December 31, 2016.

U.S. Department of Education Restraint & Seclusion policies by State (external link)

Another resources which has been recommended by several Parent Centers is available through The Autism National Committee (Autcom.org):  How Safe is the Schoolhouse?  (external link)

 

What Does a Parent Center Do?

Federally funded Parent Training and Information Centers (PTIs) are found in every State, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. Large States have more than one PTI.   In addition, thirty federally funded Community Parent Resource Centers (CPRCs) focus on unserved or underserved populations throughout the United States and territories. Together, the PTIs and CPRCs (collectively referred to as Parent Centers) can play a vital role in supporting your work with Exceptional Family Members in your communities. The following information is a quick fact sheet on what a federally funded Parent Center is required to do through their grants and some suggestions on how you can utilize them effectively.

Continue reading “What Does a Parent Center Do?”

Interstate Compact on Educational Opportunities for Military Children

The Interstate Compact on Educational Opportunities for Military Children was created to provide a smooth transition for military children as their families relocate from installation to installation. “While the Compact is not exhaustive in its coverage, it does address the key issues encountered by military families: eligibility, enrollment, placement and graduation” (NCSL, 2014). The Compact has been created with the hope that students will not lose academic time in transition, obtain an appropriate placement, and be able to graduate on time. Currently, all 50 states and District of Columbia participate in the Compact. Continue reading “Interstate Compact on Educational Opportunities for Military Children”