Scholarships! Financial Resources for Military and Non-military Youth with Disabilities

A college education can be extremely expensive, and debt from student loans can impact students and their families for years. Military parents may have financial challenges paying for college as military salaries and benefits don’t always stretch to cover today’s higher education costs. Earning scholarships is an excellent way to lower future monthly payments; some scholarship awards completely cover annual college expenses!

Below are two resources: scholarships for military-connected youth, and scholarships for youth with disabilities. The lists include awards for two- and four-year undergraduate degrees, graduate studies and vocational programs. All scholarships are national in scope; a few are international. Youth and their families may find scholarships that fit their needs or inspiration for a further search. Parent centers:  feel free to select and share the most relevant scholarships for the families you serve. These lists are great for youth outreach, email campaigns, social media, workshops, support groups, resource fairs and newsletters.

Post-High School Transition Resource for Military Families-with handout

Military families move both in and out of states on a regular basis. Parent centers can offer families some of the following select resources gathered from the Center for Parent Information and Resources (CPIR), US Department of Labor, US Department of Education, Social Security Administration, and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

NEW! We’ve added thisfor military families. Although it’s helpful to highly-mobile families with children of any age, it may be especially useful for transition-age youth whose families are new to a state.

Each resource is nationwide and provides state-specific information. Parent centers can encourage military-connected youth and their families to research state and local agencies in advance of a move, locate and make contacts, and start achieving transition goals in their new location. At the end of this article, there is a handout for parents and youth you can brand with your parent center’s logo.

Employment

Employment Center at Installations (listed on installation websites under Morale, Welfare and Recreation)

List of Vocational Rehabilitation agencies by State – from the US Department of Labor

Federal Schedule A Hiring Authority Fact Sheet: Tips for Youth and Young Adults with Disabilities Interested in Starting a Career with the Federal Government  84% of Federal jobs are located outside the greater Washington, DC area! The Schedule A Hiring Authority bypasses the traditional methods for getting a Federal job and allows individuals to apply for a Federal appointment through a noncompetitive process. If an individual meets the eligibility requirements for the appointment and the minimum position qualifications, he or she can be hired without competing with the general public.

careeronestop>Find Local Help  -US Department of Labor.  This extensive site is mobile-friendly.

Other interesting links include the Apprenticeship Office Finder, and the Native American Program Finder.

Employment and training helpline at careeronestop:

1-877-US2-JOBS
(1-877-872-5627)
TTY: 1-877-889-5627

Bureau of Labor Statistics K-12 Student Resources: interactive tools for major metropolitan areas, regions and States on the economy and employment; designed for student use.

College

Education Center at Installations (listed on the installation website under Morale, Welfare and Recreation)

Community College finder (from careeronestop)

If the military-connected youth you’re assisting has intellectual disabilities or autism, Think College has nation-wide resources for youth who would like to attend college and their parents.

What’s Happening in Your State? Interactive map or table for learning about activities, policies, legislation, and contact information about postsecondary education for students with intellectual disability, by State. Includes links to relevant websites.

Find a College: interactive map with information on 265 college programs for students with intellectual disability by State, plus the How to Think College Guide to Conducting a College Search.

Government Benefit Agencies

Interactive Map of State Medicaid and CHIP Profiles (Medicaid.gov): Information includes a State’s Demonstrations and Waivers.

Social Security Office Locator by Zip Code

For Transition-Age Youth: Military Family Resource (add your parent center’s information!)

Great New Addition to the Exceptional Family Member Program (EFMP)

Military OneSource “EFMP Resources, Options and Consultations” (EFMP ROC) is a new program that provides military families who have members with special health or educational needs with enhanced services   Special needs consultants are available by appointment, via phone or video at no cost, and there is no limit to the number of appointments families can make.

Continue reading “Great New Addition to the Exceptional Family Member Program (EFMP)”

Help Military Families Prepare Their Child’s School for Deployment -with handout!

As we know, having a parent away for a lengthy time places extra stress on children and the at-home parent, siblings or other care givers. No matter how often a military parent is deployed, and no matter how well-prepared a child might be for a parent’s absence, children with disabilities may be particularly vulnerable to the effects of stress on their physical and emotional well-being.

To help improve support for the child and increased understanding and support from teachers and schools, here are a few ways you and your center can help military families prepare their child’s school for deployment:

Continue reading “Help Military Families Prepare Their Child’s School for Deployment -with handout!”

Resolve School Issues with the Interstate Compact-2 Parent Handouts

The Interstate Compact is an excellent tool for your work with military families. There are resources for parents that describe what the Interstate Compact is, and what it can be used for. These two handouts are for military parents who want to know what specific steps to take to start resolving issues by using the Compact, and what their next steps are if their first efforts don’t succeed. You’ll find them helpful too!

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Procedural Safeguards in Department of Defense Education Activity (DODEA) Schools

Parent Centers know the Procedural Safeguards in the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Did you know that Department of Defense Activity (DoDEA) Schools have their own processes? If you work with military families who have a Permanent Change of Station (PCS) to or from these locations or work in the following locations (whose children attended or plan on attending a DoDEA school) this information will be particularly helpful for you.  Continue reading “Procedural Safeguards in Department of Defense Education Activity (DODEA) Schools”

Military Children, Accommodations and College Entrance Exams

The transition from high school to college can be a daunting experience for any teenager, however, it can be even more challenging when that teenager is part of a military family. Part of the transition process is preparing for and taking the entrance exams to college. If the student is receiving accommodations in school, he/she may qualify to receive special accommodations when taking a college entrance exam. Being aware of the process and requirements to receive accommodations can help ease the anxiety and pressure of taking the test. Continue reading “Military Children, Accommodations and College Entrance Exams”

State Report Cards Will Include Military Students

The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) requires States to report on the academic progress of military-connected students and other important data that will tell military parents, advocates for military children, and Parent Centers who serve military families how well these highly-mobile students are doing in school. Read on for expected outcomes, links to articles on the topic, and the key excerpt from ESSA.

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What is JAG and how does it relate to Special Education?

JAG stands for Judge Advocate General, and the JAG Corps (sometimes just known as JAG) is the legal branch of the military. Officers in the JAG work as legal advisors to a specific command, but their services are also available to individual service members and their families. When a military family has a child with special educational or medical needs, the JAG officer can be an invaluable resource. Families can be advised on their legal rights with respect to their child’s education (including differences between public and Department of Defense schools), legal preparation for deployment, Supplemental Social Security (SSI) and estate planning.

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